Photo: Imaxtree (3)

DESIGNER: Marios Schwab's debut collection for the house

INSPIRATION: 1970's Halston

TOP LOOKS: Canary yellow knit cape mini-dress; Green single sleeve jersey pants-jumper; Taupe molded wool mini-dress with geometric shaping; Off-white single long sleeve gowns; black velvet cut-out cocktail dress; Red sleeveless cocktail dress and gown

ACCESSORIES: Platform sandals with puffy straps and open-front knee-high and ankle boots; modern jewelry like poured metal in the form of Bluetooth-like ear pieces, liquid metal belts, rings and bracelets

WHO WAS THERE: New Halston diffusion-line designer, Sarah Jessica Parker, investor, Harvey Weinstein, Carine Roitfled, Anna della Russo, a Brit-pack including Hilary Alexander, Tim Blanks, and designer, Marios Schwaub

WHAT WE THOUGHT: The severe mirror set and dark lyric-less music, made us feel as though we were walking into an Alexander McQueen show, an eerie sentiment echoed by several observers. But in other words, this was a strong collection by an uncompromising young British designer with a modern point of view.

The mirrored obelisks were a reference to the space age 1970's when Halston was king, and to the vanity of the era. One model lay down on a reflective bed and stared transfixed with her own reflection.

The clothes were modern (in a 1970's way) too. There was a pure color palette of Crayola yellow, green, red, gray, mauve, teal, taupe and ivory. And shapes were softly draped but direct and graphic-in keeping with the original Halston's legacy.

There were long sleeve gowns and jumpers, but with one sleeve only. There were Courreges-esque abbreviated bubble shifts, wide straps that wrap around in panels, fur sleeves and skirts, all in monochrome. Halston is a house of great stature--an American legend--but its enigmatic and signature simplicity has been aped with very little contemporary success.

This is by far the best iteration we have seen of the designer's vision in the decade we have been watching. Maybe it takes an Englishman to get iconic American right.