Get sleek and shiny locks. Photo: Harry Vorsteher, Corbis

Well here's some news that has our hair standing on end.

The Brazilian Blowout hair-smoothing treatment is facing allegations that it contains high levels of formaldehyde, WWD reports.

The popular straightening process -- which StyleList recently road-tested -- is facing a backlash from salons and customers after lab results from the Oregon Health & Science University's Center for Research on Occupational and Environmental Toxicology indicated traces of the carcinogenic formaldehyde in its formula, according to the paper.

The tests -- which reportedly found between 4.85 and 10.6 percent formaldehyde -- were conducted in response to complaints at two Portland salons of eye irritation and nose burning.

Hmmm. Suddenly a little frizz doesn't seem so annoying.

Brazilian Blowout's CEO Mike Brady now claims to WWD that separate tests show the formula -- touted as formaldehyde free -- contains between .00049 and .49 percent of the chemical. A product must contain no more than .2 percent of formaldehyde to be deemed safe by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review, the source reports.

And because earlier tests reportedly showed lower levels, Brady is pointing the finger at manufacturer Cadiveu Brazil, which in turn, is accusing Brazilian Blowout of tampering with its formulas, according to WWD.

While some government agencies are now reportedly investigating the matter, some salons have scaled back their straightening services while taking safety precautions such as wearing masks or installing carbon filters.

Among those cancelling their Brazilian Blowout services are Manhattan's John Barrett Salon and Frédéric Fekkai salons, following disturbing test results conducted by Fekkai's parent company, Procter & Gamble.

"We wanted to make sure this product was living up to its claims," P&G spokesman Brent Miller told the paper.

"The product billed itself as formaldehyde free. Our testing showed that it contained high levels of formaldehyde and, as a result, we no longer offer the treatment."

Still, smooth, silky hair may trump safety concerns.

"The clients don't care," Dror Kradt of the Pierre Michel Salon, which still offers the service, albeit on a limited basis, revealed to WWD.

"They want it done. It is a life changer."

Would you still try the Brazilian Blowout despite any potential health risks? Leave a comment.

Meanwhile, learn how to deal with thinning hair. And click here for a super simple at-home treatment that banishes frizz and delivers shine.